All twenty two victims of the Manchester attack have now been named
Wednesday 24th May 2017 @ 09:33 by Adam Higgins
Greater Manchester News

Latest developments:

  • All 22 victims of Monday night’s terror attack at the Manchester Arena have been named
  • UK terror threat raised to critical but no military personnel will be deployed in Manchester
  • Police confirm they are investigating a “network”
  • First image of suspected suicide bomber, 22-year-old Salman Abedi, emerges
  • His father and two brothers have also been arrested in Libya
  • Ten people have been arrested in connection with the attack
  • Raids conducted in Manchester city centre
  • 23 people remain in critical care in hospital
  • Her Majesty the Queen has visited staff and patients at Manchester Children’s Hospital
  • GMP release timeline of Monday night’s events
  • Tameside pays tribute to those affected 
  • Donations for victims and families has passed £1.3million
  • Victoria station will be closed until families are given a chance to visit the scene

All twenty-two victims of the Manchester attack have now been named.

They died when a suicide bomber detonated a shrapnel bomb in a foyer between Manchester Arena and Victoria Station. The bomb went off at around 10.30pm, just seconds after a concert by Ariana Grande had finished and concert-goers began to leave the arena.

One of the victims, Elaine McIver, was a serving police officer with Cheshire Police. Off-duty, she was attended the concert with her partner Paul who was also injured in the blast.

Elaine’s family have paid tribute to her in a statement. It says: “Elaine was a much loved daughter, sister, Auntie, friend and colleague, the best we could ever have wished for.

“She was everyone’s friend, thoughtful beyond belief with an effervescent and outgoing personality.

“She would have been devastated by the injuries sustained by her partner Paul, and we all wish him a speedy recovery.

“Elaine just loved life, and had a major love of music. Despite what has happened to her, she would want us all to carry on regardless and not be frightened by fear tactics, instead she regularly urged us all to rise up against it.

“Although we will all miss her beyond belief, we absolutely know she will live in our hearts forever.”

The victims are:

  • Courtney Boyle, 19
  • Philip Tron, 32
  • Nell Jones, 14
  • Saffie Rose Roussos, 8
  • Georgina Callander, 18
  • Angelika Klis, 40
  • Marcin Klis, 42
  • Olivia Campbell, 15
  • Martyn Hett, 29
  • Kelly Brewster, 32
  • John Atkinson, 28
  • Alison Howe, 45
  • Lisa Lees, 47
  • Jane Tweddle-Taylor, 51,
  • Michelle Kiss,
  • Wendy Fawell, 50
  • Elaine McIver
  • Eilidh MacLeod, 14
  • Chloe Rutherford, 17
  • Liam Curry, 19
  • Sorrel Leczkowski, 14
  • Megan Hurley.

A fundraising effort to support the victim’s families has passed the £1,300,000 mark. You can add to the donations flooding in by clicking here. Manchester City and Manchester United have pledged a further £1,000,000 between them and that added to the Lord Mayor’s emergency fund means over £3,000,000 has been raised in total.

A hotline remains in place for people concerned about loved ones – 0800 096 0095.

At 11am on Thursday, the nation observed a minute’s silence in honour of the victims. A huge crowd gathered in Manchester’s St. Anne’s Square where floral tributes have been laid.

Earlier in the week, thousands of people across Tameside and Greater Manchester turned out at vigils to remember the deceased and everyone else affected by the attack.

Albert Square was packed on Tuesday evening as people gathered outside the town hall to hold a minute’s silence and pay tribute to those killed, the hundreds injured and their loved ones.

The Bishop of Manchester, David Walker, led the prayers while politicians, dignataries, GMP Chief Constable Ian Hopkins and Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, appeared on stage before a moving rendition of his inspirational poem ‘This Is The Place’ by poet Tony Walsh.

There were also candlelight vigils at Wedneshough Green in Hollingworth and Armentieres Square in Stalybridge, while churches throughout the borough were open for quiet prayer and reflection throughout the day and evening.

Further local vigils were held on Wednesday evening, including one in Mossley. Mayor Chris Lyness led a service on Mossley Market Ground, not out of her civic duty but as a member of the community.  A vigil was held at King George the Fifth Park in Ashton, where people let off pink balloons in remembrance of the victims.

Children from schools across Tameside have been showing solidarity with everyone affected by Monday night. From writing prayers and producing artwork to taking part in special remembrance assemblies and services, pupils have paid tribute to the victims in their own powerful and poignant ways.

On Wednesday, the first picture has emerged of the suspected suicide bomber who carried out the attack – 22-year-old Salman Abedi, a former Salford University student of Libyan origin who was born in Manchester and grew up in the Whalley Range area.

The bombing suspect’s father and two brothers have also been arrested in Tripoli, Libya’s capital, by on suspicion of links to ISIS.

The eight men arrested in connection with the attack remain in custody. A 34-year-old woman and a 16-year-old boy were also arrested but have since been released without charge.

The arrests were made in Manchester, Wigan and Nuneaton. GMP Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said: “I want to reassure people that the arrests that we have made are significant, and initial searches of premises have revealed items that we believe are very important to the investigation.

“These searches will take several days to complete, as you would expect, therefore there will be some disruption. However, it is important that we continue with these searches.”

He has also said that it’s very clear police are investigating a “network” linked to the bomber.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd has said it “seems likely” that Abedi was not acting alone and he was known to security services.

The NHS have said that 116 people were treated across eight hospitals after the attack. Twenty-three people remain in critical care.

Her Majesty the Queen has made a surprise visit to staff and patients at Manchester Children’s Hospital, where fourteen young people are being treated. Five are in a critical condition.

A number of people from the Tameside and Glossopdale areas are now known to have been caught up in the attack, many lucky enough to have escaped but two are in hospital. The extent of their injuries, however is not known.

Victoria train station, which connects Ashton and Stalybridge to the city centre, is expected to be closed for the foreseeable future, with rail and tram services affected. Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham says the Manchester Arena and the station will only reopen once families have been consulted and been given a chance to visit the scene, if they wish.

Roads are also expected to be busier than usual and people are advised to plan travel carefully and allow extra time for their journeys.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Theresa May confirmed on Tuesday evening that the UK terror threat level has been raised from severe to its highest level of “critical”.

Responding to the news, Deputy Chief Constable Ian Pilling said in a statement: “This is a fast moving investigation and we continue to have significant resources in place. Raising the threat level to critical will support our ongoing operation.

“People across Greater Manchester have seen an increased police presence throughout the day and this will continue. They will be seen at key locations across the region.

“We are continuing to work with the national counter terrorism policing network and UK intelligence services as part of the response to dealing with the tragic events that took place 24 hours ago.

“We would ask people to remain vigilant as they have been throughout the day and report anything in confident to the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789321 or in an emergency 999.

“People have shown tremendous strength and resilience throughout the day and we need this to continue in the difficult days ahead.”

Speaking about the threat level, Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said: “With the threat level being increased to critical you will be aware that military are supporting policing across the country. This is about using the military across sites in London and elsewhere to free up armed police officers to support police forces.

“There are no military personnel patrolling Manchester but we are therefore able to receive additional armed policing support because of this plan.”

Greater Manchester Police have issued a timeline of how events unfolded during Monday’s horrific attack.

·        10:33pm – First call made to police reporting possible explosion and multiple injuries.

·        10:39pm – GMP PCSO who was nearby is first responder on the scene.

·        10:39pm – A total of 28 calls are made to police within first six minutes of initial call.

·        10:46pm – British Transport Police confirm there are a large number of casualties inside Manchester Arena.

·        10:46pm – First road closure put in place on Great Clowes Street outside Manchester Arena.

·        10.47pm – Police start treating the response as a possible terrorist incident

·        10:47pm – Area around Manchester Arena is closed, including roads and transport networks.

·        10:47pm – Officers at the scene confirm multiple people injured during the attack.

·        10:47pm – Confirmation from first responders that explosion has taken place

·        11:33pm – 240 calls about the incident received during first hour of initial call being made.

·        11:44pm – GMP confirm multiple fatalities and others have been injured during attack.

·        1:10am – GMP confirm 19 people have died and around 50 others reported injured in what is being treated as a terrorist attack.

·        7am – GMP confirm that a total of 22 victims have been confirmed dead in addition to the man believed to have been responsible for the attack after detonating an improvised explosive device. Confirmation of over 400 officers and staff involved in the response overnight.