The stars come out to remember Alex
Friday 22nd November 2013 @ 13:00 by Max Wieland
Community
Street Support: Actor Ian Puleston-Davies, Wayne Williams (Alex's father), Julie Hesmondhalgh with Abbie Williams (Alex's sister), Krissi Bohn and Debbie Rush.

Street Support: Actor Ian Puleston-Davies, Wayne Williams (Alex’s father), Julie Hesmondhalgh with Abbie Williams (Alex’s sister), Krissi Bohn and Debbie Rush.

 

A successful charity winter ball has added to the coffers of the Alex Williams ‘Believe and Achieve Tribute Fund’ for the Meningitis Trust.
Alex’s parents Wayne and Alison along with his sister Abbie welcomed more than 400 guests to the event at the Palace Hotel in Manchester on Saturday.
Many local businesses and representatives from Tameside schools were there and so too were  Coronation Street stars Julie Hesmondhalgh, Debbie Rush, Krissi Bohn and Ian Puleston-Davies.
A glamorous evening of champagne, fine food, fun and entertainment set in a spectacular Winter Wonderland scene was hosted by comedian Justin Moorhouse.
Julie Hesmondhalgh who plays Hayley Cropper in the street announced that Alex’s fund for the Meningitis Trust had to date raised over £90,000.
She also gave to thanks to Progressive Engineering of Audenshaw for a donation of £1,000 on the night.
She added that it had been a wonderful night and one which Alex would have been proud of.
Other entertainers at the ball included the ‘Ice Pixies’ a kind of Mr and Mrs Jack Frost straight from the coldest, most magical city Frostonia.
Alex contracted meningitis at the age of seven which left him with many after-effects.
But this never stopped him spending countless hours raising funds and awareness of the devastating disease.
He tirelessly worked to ensure people did not suffer on their own when the Meningitis Trust was there to help them.
He was a founder Young Ambassador of the Trust and an inspirational young man who delivered a petition to Downing Street about better educational support for child-ren with meningitis.
He became a Tameside Sport Ambassador, played wheelchair basketball and volunteered three times a week for a disabled dance class.

Before his death at the age of 18 in August 2012 he carried the Olympic Torch, and then spent time taking it around Tameside schools so children could see it.
He told them no matter what difficulties they may have they should all “believe and achieve”.
The fund was set up to help carry on the work Alex started and of which he was so proud.
If you would like to contribute or to find out more about the fund you can contact [email protected]